Blue States Would Rather Watch Cities Burn Than Work With Trump


Governors in blue states continue their resistance to President Trump’s every move, including his hardening stance against the rioting and the looting that are leaving major cities in their wake.

Buck Sexton, the host of “The Buck Sexton Show,” said Tuesday that Trump made the right move when he told governors to deploy the National Guard “in sufficient numbers” and that the law enforcement “dominates” the streets. Sexton said that governors—who’ve also been dragging their feet on reopening the country amid the coronavirus pandemic—are also “pushing back” on Trump’s latest directive.

“They’ve made this political,” Sexton said. “They don’t care what’s happening to their residents. They don’t care what’s going on in communities—including communities of color—which are disproportionately damaged and affected by many of these riots and looting.”

President Trump has taken a tough stance against the rioters and threatened military force in cities if local leaders refuse to stop the unrest. Democrats, like Joe Biden, have largely taken a softer approach. Biden, who recently said if an African-American doesn’t vote for him “you ain’t black—said in a speech in Philadelphia Tuesday that, as president, he would not “fan the flames of hate.”

Democrats have been quick to attack Trump over the George Floyd unrest and essentially blamed him over the countries expanding divide. Rep. Maxine Waters, D-Calif., said in an interview that Trump was partly to blame for Floyd’s death. The criticism comes even though Trump immediately spoke out against what happened to Floyd and directed the FBI to expedite the handling of the case into the officers involved in the arrest.

Sexton said looting at major stores like Microsoft or Rolex may attract the most attention in the media, but small businesses have been crushed by these riots. Many of these stores were fighting for their survival even before the looting. He said he passed a small Indian restaurant near his apartment, which sits about 10 people. It was clearly not part of a major chain.

“It was shattered,” Sexton said. “Someone went in and kicked in the door, kicked in the window, just broke the glass everywhere, and it was still there. No one was fixing it this morning because the restaurant’s probably been closed for two or three months now.”

Sexton continued, “It’s about rage. It’s about people kicking in the front door of an Indian-American restaurant that the owner uses to feed his or her family.”